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Six Parent Tips for Preventing Teen DUI – What You Should Know

Posted by Steve Karimi | Feb 07, 2018 | 0 Comments

Teen drinking accounts for up to 12 percent of American alcohol consumption. Youth pay attention to the attitudes and words parents have in the home. Parents can influence their children's behavior toward drinking without even realizing. Some studies attribute up to 80 percent of children's behaviors of drinking before they are legal to the parents' attitudes. When parents allow their children to consume alcohol at home in small amounts, often they believe this helps their children learn moderation in consuming alcohol. Studies reflect very different results: Children think drinking is OK when their parents serve it to them. Problem is, when kids drink alcohol outside their parents' home, they often drink far more. And they may choose to drive when they do.

Six Tips that Help Parents Raise Teens Who Choose NOT to Drink

1. Never serve alcohol to teenagers in your home—your own or any other teenager.

When parents follow the law of the land by not allowing their teenagers to drink alcohol at home or anywhere, they are showing alcohol is not a good choice for teenagers.

2. Involve your teenagers in activities outside the home.

When teenagers are left at home during the summer months, boredom can pave the way to “creative ideas” that could involve experimenting with drugs and alcohol. Find your teen's interests and get them involved.

3. Become an involved parent.

Attend forums where schools inform parents about drugs and alcohol and tips to delay your teenagers' experiences with alcohol.

4. Talk to your children, openly and frequently, about responsible alcohol use.

Keep the conversation open and speak freely about situations your teens may find themselves in. Give your kids a chance to brainstorm ways how to say no, how to approach a situation where someone who has been drinking attempts to drive a vehicle, and how to remove themselves from the situations that make them feel uncomfortable.

5. Be Aware of stressors for your teens.

Take your teenagers stress seriously. If your teen is transitioning from middle school to high school or is getting used to new transportation, if a divorce is imminent in your family, or if your teen is struggling with relationships, it is important to help your teen in whatever way makes sense. These stressful periods are often a pathway to alcohol.

6. Be consistent.

As teens grow more independent, it can be tempting to simply allow them to “live their lives.” Remaining consistent in keeping communications open and maintaining a watchful eye on your teens is a key element in helping your minors grow into adults with healthy views of alcohol use and driving.

If your child has been charged with a Minor DUI, Karimi Law Office is uniquely positioned to help you and your child. Steve Karimi has years of prosecution experience and now employs that knowledge to help families like yours overcome Minor DUI charges. Call right now to share your child's story with Karimi Law Office; we have a 24-hour helpline for parents. Call today.

About the Author

Steve Karimi

Steve Karimi attended Pepperdine University School of Law. After graduation he worked as a prosecutor in Seattle where he gained valuable insight to the criminal justice system. Attorney Karimi uses his experiences as a prosecutor everyday only now he fights for the justice of those accused.

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